Monthly Archives: August 2014

Why you should do foresight?

I’ve been working with foresight more or less my whole career on and off. Both in literature and practice it is apparent that foresight needs motivation and practitioners have a hard time grasping why should they invest their time and resources to something that is so ‘out there’. Thousands of words have been expelled explaining why you should do foresight.

Without going into the forma explanation, I’m coming out with an informal and very persuasive one. Today at the office coffee room, my colleague Kristian Borch put out the most common sense and relatable reason which I’m going to paraphrase here.

It’s like with your girl friend or wife – If you sense there might be something wrong, you should talk about it.

The lesson everybody has probably learned by the time they are entering professional life is that if there are potential problems and conflicts in your life, letting them seethe while glossing over them poses a significant risk that those problems will escalate in the future. They might not do so right away, but it is more than likely that sooner or later it will happen.

What is worse, often you see in the aftermath, that the conflict would have been probably averted altogether by having the discussion in the first place. Granted, the discussion isn’t always a nice and nurturing experience, and perhaps many organizations do not have a culture that supports that kind of exchanges, but biting the bullet is often better than having the discussion when the situation blows all over your face.

So that’s why you should do foresight, you recognize the risks that are ahead explicitly and decide the course action more informed. You might even discover something about yourself and your coworkers in the process.

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